Funny British Words Americans Dont Use

Discussion in 'Spam Heaven' started by Greasy Pete, Oct 24, 2007.

  1. Greasy Pete

    Greasy Pete Senior Member

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  2. .HaVoC.

    .HaVoC. ┌∩┐(-_-)┌∩┐

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    <span style="font-family:Comic Sans MS">lol arse</span>
     
  3. cR&#33;T&#33;caL

    cR&#33;T&#33;caL Well-Known Member

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    rumpy pumpy
    (informal) Sexual intercourse, used slightly jokingly

    lol...
     
  4. .ZERO

    .ZERO Nigga wit a PSD

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    I love how americans cant say twat :P
     
  5. Dj SpliTT

    Dj SpliTT Well-Known Member

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    vat is amazing. =]
     
  6. xlink

    xlink GR's Tech Enthusiast

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    list= ----

    boardies, board shorts.
    long shorts used for surfing or beachwear (US and UK also: swimming trunks)

    I belevie they call them that here too.
     
  7. `sparks

    `sparks Jcoca

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    Yupp...Im actually wearing a neon green pair right now ^_^
     
  8. Stunt189

    Stunt189 Well-Known Member

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    Lmao bint. =P

    a derogatory term for a woman. Usage varies with a range of harshness from 'bitch', referring to a disagreeable and domineering woman, to only a slightly derogatory term for a young woman (from the Arabic for a girl).
     
  9. .difuzeD

    .difuzeD Well-Known Member

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    co͏ck/co͏ckle
    (informal) affectionate term used in Northern England, similar to love or darling. "Are you alright, co͏ck?"

    lol'd
     
  10. kirbir

    kirbir Senior Member

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    answerphone
    (originally from trademark Ansafone™) automated telephone answering device (US and UK also: answering machine)

    Lies we call it an answering machine, ive never heard anyone call it an answerphone.

    argy-bargy
    (informal) fighting or, less intimidatingly, trouble.

    Again what a load of ------ and balls, i have never in all my life heard that ----.

    artic lorry
    (abbreviation of 'articulated lorry') (US: ------, -------trailer truck)

    Again i have never heard anyone call a lorry/truck and artic lorry....

    berk
    a mildly derogatory term for a silly person. The word is an abbreviation of either 'Berkshire Hunt' or 'Berkeley Hunt' (it is uncertain which is the original phrase), ------ney rhyming slang for ------. (Note that 'berk' rhymes with 'work', whereas the first syllable of both 'Berkshire' and 'Berkeley' is pronounced 'bark'.)

    The ------ is that? I think not....

    bimble
    to wander aimlessly or stroll/walk without urgency to a destination.

    Again i think not...

    bint
    a derogatory term for a woman. Usage varies with a range of harshness from 'bitch', referring to a disagreeable and domineering woman, to only a slightly derogatory term for a young woman (from the Arabic for a girl).

    I would really like to know where they get these 'words' from, we certainly don't say any of that ---- where i live.

    blues and twos
    (slang) emergency vehicle with lights and sirens (emergency services in the UK generally use blue flashing lights and a two-tone siren)

    hahahahahaha NO!.

    boardies, board shorts.
    long shorts used for surfing or beachwear (US and UK also: swimming trunks)

    Hmm... shorts, swimming shorts etc...never heard of bloody boardies nor board shorts, the ------??

    bobbie, bobby
    police officer, named after Sir Robert Peel, the instigator of the world's first organised police force

    haha another stupid one, who the hell says bobbie??

    bunk off
    (informal) to play truant from school (US also play hooky)

    Nah we usually just say were waggin it, lol...

    Man theres so many stupid ones in there, where in the world did they get these from? Certainly not from where i live anyway....

    You have to laugh at it though, haha
     
  11. LL5

    LL5 Senior Member

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    wtf, I've not heard of half of them... =p

    [to fall] arse over tit
    (vulgar, alternatively arse over tit/tip) [to fall] head over heels. (US: ass over tea kettle).

    ROFL, who the hell says that?

    nodder
    (regional slang) condom

    ROFLMAO, :rofl: that's complete Bollocks

    (vulgar; originally ballocks, colloquially also spelled as bollox) testicles; verbal rubbish (as in "you're talking bollocks"). The somewhat similar bollix is found in American English, but without the anatomical connotations or vulgar sense meaning 'mess up'. The twin pulley blocks at the top of a ship's mast are also known as bollocks, and in the 18th century priests were colloquially referred to as bollocks; it was by claiming this last usage that the Sex Pistols prevented their album Never Mind the Bollocks from being banned under British obscenity laws. Related phrases include bollocksed, which means either tired ("I'm bollocksed!") or broken beyond repair; bollocks up, meaning to mess up ("He really bollocksed that up"); and [a] bollocking, meaning a stern telling off. Also The dog's bollocks is a fairly common phrase used in British English, although this has the opposite meaning - something described as "The dog's bollocks" is something considered to be very good. In mixed company this phrased may be toned down to "The mutts nuts" (US: bull----)
     
  12. terrorDESIGNS

    terrorDESIGNS Well-Known Member

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    on the beat = police officers patroling
    jumpin = hooky from school

    we say that round in bolton.
     
  13. FM Gus

    FM Gus Well-Known Member

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    Artic Lorry? Kirbir, how have you never heard of that? o_O

    Police = pronounced Poa-lice in Scotland.
     
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    Faith.09 Banned from GR

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  15. Greasy Pete

    Greasy Pete Senior Member

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    what the hells a lory?

    i personally think England English is a destruction for a good language, most Americans do.
     

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